whistleblower protection

Beware.  Routine criticisms of job performance when directed to employees engaged in a caring profession, may subject you to retaliation and whistleblower claims.

So you hire an employee, call her a brick layer.  She is a horrible brick layer.  You get in constant arguments with her concerning the quality of her brick laying.  You say that the bricks must be square and aligned and she says, no they look better if they are crooked, uneven and “rustic.”  Firing that employee for discharging her duties as a brick layer in a way the employer finds unacceptable is, in almost all cases, a low risk decision.  Subjective dislike of an employee’s work performance is a time honored and well recognized “legitimate nondiscriminatory, nonretaliatory,” reason for termination.
Continue Reading Have You Ever Disagreed With An Employee About How They Should Do Their Work?

The year-end holidays tend to be a time when employers and employees are either winding down for the year or making one last big push to close the year strongly.  California employers should make time this week, though, to ensure they are ready for the new laws which will take effect in California this Friday

Employers may begin to see an increase in whistleblower litigation.

Effective January 1, 2014, the Legislature, through Senate Bill 496, amended Section 1102.5, California’s “whistleblower protection” statute.  We covered this in our “year in review” seminar, but given the scope of the changes in the law, we wanted to make sure to get the word

Section 1514A of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act states that:

“No [public] company . . . , or any officer, employee, contractor, subcontractor, or agent of such company, may discharge, demote, suspend, threaten, harass, or in any other manner discriminate against an employee in the terms and conditions of employment because of [whistleblowing or other protected activity].”

The FSMA is the most extensive change to the U.S. food safety system in more than 70 years. Signed into law in 2011, the FSMA directs the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue numerous regulations directed toward enhancing food safety and minimize the risk of foodborne illnesses. As with almost every law nowadays, the FSMA contains a whistleblower provision to ostensibly “advance the broad goals” of the new law.

Continue Reading Food and Beverage Companies Beware: New Risks Associated with Whistleblower Protections Under the Food Safety Modernization Act