New Legislation and Regulations

As temperatures rise, California law requires employers with outdoor employees to take steps to protect workers from heat illness. Shauna Correia reviews Cal/OSHA’s ‘Heat Illness Prevention Standards” for outdoor worksites in this archive episode of California Employment News.Continue Reading California Employment News: Summer is Coming – is Your Worksite Ready for the Heat? (ARCHIVE)

In late March 2024, California Assemblyman Matt Haney (D-San Francisco) introduced a bill, AB 2751, that would recognize a right for employees in California to “disconnect” or ignore communications from their employer during certain non-work hours.  The Bill, in its current form, requires an employer to establish a workplace policy that will allow employees “the right to disconnect” from communications from their employer during non-working hours, except for emergencies and/or scheduling purposes.  The policy must define working vs. non-working hours and make clear that employees have the right to ignore communications from the employer during the policy’s specified non-working hours.  The proposed law also provides employees the right to file a complaint with the California Labor Commissioner if the employer engages in a pattern of violations of this new law. Finally, the proposed new law states that while violations may not be punished as a misdemeanor, the employer could be subject to a fine of not less than $100 as a result of a pattern of violation of the proposed new law.Continue Reading California Legislature Considers Employee’s “Right to Disconnect”

If you’re a California employer, I hope the following is not news to you.  Pursuant to SB 553, most employers in California are required to put in place an effective Workplace Violence Prevention Plan (“WVPP”) by July 1, 2024. SB 553 added section 6401.9 to the California Labor Code to address the requirements for a compliant WVPP. Continue Reading Preparing Your Workplace Violence Prevention Plan Just Got a Little Easier – CalOSHA Issues a Model Plan & Other Resources

CTA Compliance Team

On March 1, 2024, a lower Alabama federal court held that the Corporate Transparency Act, which requires certain businesses to file a BOI Report with FinCEN that includes information about their beneficial owners, is unconstitutional. Importantly, this ruling DOES NOT affect the legal obligation of entities formed in California, Nevada, or Delaware (among other states)

UPDATED 3/04/2024

On March 1, 2024, a lower Alabama federal court held that the Corporate Transparency Act, which requires certain businesses to file a BOI Report with FinCEN that includes information about their beneficial owners, is unconstitutional. Importantly, this ruling DOES NOT affect the legal obligation of entities formed in California, Nevada, or Delaware (among other states) to file their BOI Report within the timeframes specified in the chart below at this time.  We are monitoring the development of this and similar court actions across the nation and will continue to provide information about them to those who have indicated a desire to receive this information from us.

ORIGINAL NOTICE 2/20/2024

The Corporate Transparency Act (“CTA”), a new federal filing requirement for many business entities, became effective on January 1, 2024.  The CTA was enacted as part of the Anti-Money Laundering Act of 2020 to provide Federal and State enforcement agencies with more comprehensive information about small and shell companies to help control money laundering and terrorist financing activities.  The database of information provided by the CTA Reports will not be available to the general public but will be accessible by Federal and most states’ criminal and financial law enforcement agencies.Continue Reading Important Notice Regarding the Corporate Transparency Act Filing Requirements (Update 3/1/2024)