It’s Pride month: rainbow flags are flying, social media avatars are changing, and parade planning is in full swing. In addition to celebrations, California businesses can use this important month to review their practices and policies to ensure an inclusive environment for LGBTQ+ employees. Although creating a supportive work environment is a kind and empathetic thing to do, it’s also the law. More about that later, but first: a checklist. Not all of the following are mandatory requirements; some suggestions may be aspirational. However, reviewing these options is an excellent place to start to ensure that we all respect the rights of our LGBTQ+ employees and comply with the law.

Continue Reading A California Workplace Checklist for Pride Month

Essential leave laws every CA employer should know!  Weintraub Tobin attorneys Meagan Bainbridge and Ryan Abernethy break down the key points and provide practical advice on managing these leaves in the latest installment of California Employment News.

Continue Reading California Employment News: Brief Overview of Leave Laws All California Employers Should Be Aware Of

In October 2023, Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill No. 525 (“SB 525”), which establishes minimum wage schedules for “covered health care employees” depending on the type of facilities in which they work, and raises the minimum wage for many healthcare facilities to $21 per hour. SB 525 would have raised the minimum wage on June 1, 2024 for many of these facilities. However, on Monday, May 20, 2024, State Senator Mara Elana Durazo, the bill’s author, submitted paperwork for legislation that would delay the increase.  Senate Bill No. 828 (“SB 828”) moves the start date of the health care minimum wage law by one month to July 1, 2024.

Continue Reading California’s Minimum Wage Law for Healthcare Workers May Be Delayed

On May 10, 2024, the Ninth Circuit decided Yuriria Diaz v. Macys West Stores, Inc.  In that case, Diaz brought California Private Attorneys General Act (“PAGA”) claims against her former employer.  The district court compelled both Plaintiff’s individual and non-individual PAGA claims to arbitration, reasoning that the arbitration agreement’s broad language must be interpreted to encompass both types of claims.  Macy’s appealed.

Continue Reading Ninth Circuit Holds that Non-Individual PAGA Claims Cannot be Compelled to Arbitration Even When the Agreement Only Waives Class or Collective Actions

As temperatures rise, California law requires employers with outdoor employees to take steps to protect workers from heat illness. Shauna Correia reviews Cal/OSHA’s ‘Heat Illness Prevention Standards” for outdoor worksites in this archive episode of California Employment News.

Continue Reading California Employment News: Summer is Coming – is Your Worksite Ready for the Heat? (ARCHIVE)