Meagan Bainbridge and Lukas Clary from Weintraub Tobin’s Labor and Employment Group dive into the California Supreme Court case Huerta vs. CSI Electrical Contractors. Discover the key takeaways for employers on what constitutes compensable work time for pre- and post-shift activities in this latest installment.Continue Reading California Employment News: Can Pre- and Post-Shift Activities Be Compensated

At the request of the 9th Circuit, the California Supreme Court recently clarified the definition of “hours worked” under the Labor Code. In Huerta v. CSI Electrical Contractors, the employees worked at a solar power facility, which was located on privately-owned land. To reach the actual worksite, employees had to enter onto private land, present a badge at a security gate (at which point a security guard might “peer” into their car or truck), and then drive an additional 10–15 minutes to access the employee parking lot. It was estimated that the security check could take between 5-30 minutes. This would happen again at the end of the day. Also, because there were endangered species present on the privately-owned land, there were restrictions employees were expected to follow while driving on the road, including not exceeding a certain speed limit, and refraining from honking horns or playing loud music. The Court was asked to answer two questions with respect to the definition of “hours worked” as discussed below.Continue Reading The California Supreme Court Further Clarifies the Definition of “Hours Worked”

From minimum wage laws to confidentiality agreements, there have been several legal updates over the past year that apply to most CA employers. Lukas Clary and Ryan Abernethy break down five top developments in wage and hour law for 2024 in this special 50th edition of California Employment News.Continue Reading California Employment News: Top Developments in Wage and Hour Law for 2024

California law requires private employers with 100 or more employees and/or 100 or more workers hired through labor contractors to annually report pay, demographic, and other workforce data to the Civil Rights Department (CRD). This year, the pay data reporting portal opened on February 1, 2024, and employers have until May 8, 2024 to submit their annual reports. To aid employers, the CRD released updated FAQs as well as new versions of the pay data reporting Excel templates, a user guide, and training slides. The FAQS are available here. Continue Reading The California Civil Rights Department has Released New Guidance for Employers Required to Report Workforce Data

California recently amended its sick leave law, the Healthy Families Healthy Workplace Act, by increasing paid sick leave accrual mandates and sick time cap amounts. Lizbeth (“Beth”) West and Shauna Correia discuss these changes on this episode of California Employment News.

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