Yesterday, San Francisco Mayor London N. Breed announced a “Workers and Families First Program” to offer additional paid sick leave benefits to employees who have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.  It will apply to San Francisco private sector workers, and if fully utilized, it could provide coverage for up to 25,000 San Francisco workers.  Fortunately for already-struggling businesses, the Program is not compulsory.  In addition, the Program will set aside $10 million in public funding to help offset the burden on who have to provide an additional five days of sick leave pay to workers, beyond their existing policies under SFPLO and state law.

According to the Mayor’s press release, “The Workers and Families First Program will provide City financial assistance to businesses and nonprofits to provide additional paid sick leave time to employees, over and above their existing policies. All San Francisco businesses will be eligible, with up to 20% of funds reserved for small businesses with 50 or fewer employees. The City will contribute up to one week (40 hours) at $15.59 per hour (minimum wage) per employee, or $623 per employee. The employer will pay the difference between the minimum wage and an employee’s full hourly wage.”
Continue Reading San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Expanded Due to COVID-19

The San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors has now prohibited the widely used criminal history check box for employment applications. Unless the Mayor vetoes it, the “ban the box” ordinance will become law no later than Thursday, February 13, 2014. In addition to banning the box, the new San Francisco legislation imposes a host of additional

laborDriving across the San Francisco Bay Bridge still provides one of the most beautiful views of any City I have seen in the United States. However, once off the bridge, you witness business owners besieged by a Frankenstein type laboratory of unfriendly employment laws. There is little doubt in my mind that, but for the view from the bridge, San Francisco would be Barstow, with nary a business in sight due to anti-employer laws. While these awful employment laws are good news for surrounding employer friendly counties, such as San Mateo, Santa Clara, Marin, and Contra Costa, we must remain vigilant to ensure these toxins do not get dumped in the Bay to spread like the plaque they are.

Continue Reading San Francisco: Incubator for Bad Employment Laws