Summary of Program

Administering leaves of absence and disability accommodations in California can be very challenging.  California has a new paid sick leave law and numerous other leave laws and wage replacement benefits that interact with one another.  To properly administer leaves and accommodate employees, employers need to understand the various types of leave/accommodations available,

Recently, my Alma Mater, The University of Southern California, was sued by a former member of the Trojan football team.  Former cornerback Brian Baucham filed a lawsuit against USC and former coach Lane Kiffin, alleging he suffered permanent injuries after being forced to play in a game while he was ill.  Baucham’s lawsuit claimed that he was “forced by Coach Kiffin to play a home game even though Mr. Baucham was very ill and diagnosed by the USC Health Clinic with an influenza-like illness, viral pharyngitis and dehydration.”  After playing in a game against Berkeley, “Baucham suffered from cardiopulmonary damage, as well as brain injury with neurocognitive deficits,” according to the lawsuit.  Baucham alleges that USC and Kiffin violated both the NCAA and USC injury protocol programs when they forced him to play.

This got me to thinking: Now that the National Labor Relations Board has found that scholarship football players are employees under the NLRA, what if Mr. Baucham filed suit against USC as an employee?
Continue Reading Why Employers Should Think Twice Before Making Employees Play Hurt

Following the Yellow Brick Road of Employee Leave Rights and Accommodations.  SEAC invites you to spend the morning with attorneys and leave and accommodation experts Lizbeth (“Beth”) West and Charles (“Chuck”) Post from Weintraub Tobin as they discuss the ins and outs of this difficult area of employment law.

Date:         Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Time:

In Lupyan v. Corinthian Colleges, Inc., a FMLA interference lawsuit, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a summary judgment in favor of the employer when the employee claimed she never received an FMLA designation letter that her employer claims it mailed to her. The Court essentially held that if an employer wishes to