On March 14, 2022, the EEOC released a new technical assistance guidance document entitled “The COVID-19 Pandemic and Caregiver Discrimination Under Federal Employment Discrimination Law.

Essentially, the guidance reiterates that an employer may not discriminate against an applicant or employee under federal law on the basis of protected classes such sex (including pregnancy, sexual orientation, or gender identity), race, color, religion, national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.  However, the purpose of the guidance is to illustrate how discrimination on the basis of a protected class can occur, possibly even inadvertently, if employers make assumptions and decisions based on an applicant’s or employee’s caregiving obligations due to the Covid-19 pandemic.
Continue Reading The EEOC’s New Guidance Says Discrimination Against “Caregivers” May Violate Federal Law

On August 29, 2017, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) issued a memo to the EEOC advising that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is initiating a review and an immediate stay of the effectiveness of those aspects of the EEO-1 form that were revised on September 29, 2016. Those  revisions included

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently reported that between fiscal years 2012 and 2015, private sector charges of harassment increased to account for 30% of all charges of discrimination received by the EEOC.  These numbers indicate that harassment liability and prevention continue to be important.  The EEOC’s most recent guidance on harassment focused primarily

Perhaps because of the unfortunate social tensions arising after the U.S. Presidential election which include some inappropriate threats against immigrants and people of color, the EEOC issued its Enforcement Guidance on National Origin Discrimination last week.  The Enforcement Guidance replaces the EEOC Compliance Manual, Volume II, Section 13: National Origin Discrimination (2002).

National origin discrimination

On August 29, 2016, the EEOC issued new Enforcement Guidance on Retaliation which replaces its 1998 Compliance Manual section on retaliation. The Guidance also addresses the separate “interference” provision under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which prohibits coercion, threats, or other acts that interfere with the exercise of ADA rights.  According to the EEOC,