When a workplace practice conflicts with an employee’s religious beliefs, the employer must consider whether a religious accommodation is available. This is the basic rule of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Many times, these issues arise in the form of scheduling conflicts when an employee’s religion compels worship on a particular day. Typical examples of religious accommodations can include changing an employee’s regular working schedule or allowing him or her to switch shifts with a co-worker. Such accommodations are typically made in response to a relatively traditional perception of religious expression. However, an employee’s religion, extends beyond traditional notions of religious practices. So what happens when an employer is presented with religious accommodation requests from Vegans? While clearly a first world problem, our Courts have been busy addressing this weighty issue.

Continue Reading Vegan Religious Bias Claim Settles for Enough to Buy A Big Juicy Steak

By:  James Kachmar

Governor Jerry Brown recently signed AB1660 into law. Introduced by Assembly Member Nora Campos, AB1660 amends the Labor Code to require certain people working with minors in the entertainment industry to apply for a Child Performer Services permit and submit to a criminal background check. The bill also prohibits registered sex offenders from working with minors in the entertainment industry and imposes criminal sanctions for violation of its provisions.


Continue Reading Background Checks Required For Some Working With Minors In Entertainment Industry

If you thought all the news from the NLRB these days had to do with Posters and Recess appointments, think again. On January 6, 2012, the National Labor Relations Board emphatically rejected an arbitration agreement that required employees to waive their class action rights. This opinion squarely rejected the U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, wherein SCOTUS approved of class action waivers in compulsory arbitration agreements.

Continue Reading Class Action Waivers in Arbitration Agreements: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back! Class Action Waivers a Violation of the National Labor Relations Act