By: Lizbeth V. West, Esq.

Plaintiff Robert Rodriguez brought a putative class action against AT&T Mobility Services, LLC, on behalf of himself and all other similarly situated retail sales managers of AT&T wireless stores in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. Rodriguez asserted various claims under California law related to alleged unpaid wages, overtime compensation, and damages for statutory violations. Rodriguez filed his original complaint in Los Angeles County Superior Court and AT&T removed the case to federal court under 28 U.S.C. § 1332(d)(2) (the federal Class Action Fairness Act).


Continue Reading The Ninth Circuit Holds that Lead Plaintiffs in a Putative Class Action Don’t Get to Plead Their Way Out of Federal Court

By:   Shauna N. Correia

Governor Brown recently approved SB 1255, AB 1744 and AB 2674, amending existing Labor Code section 226 relating to wage statements. Existing law requires all employers to provide employees with accurate itemized statements with specific information, either semimonthly or at the time of each payment of wages. Penalties up to $4,000 or actual damages, plus attorneys’ fees and costs, can be imposed on employers who willfully violate these requirements. Now, wage statements for temporary services employees must contain additional information. New law also clarifies when an employee has suffered an “injury” for purposes of obtaining the penalties, and provides employers with an affirmative defense for inadvertent, one-off violations.


Continue Reading Amendments to Labor Code §226 Clarify Employers’ Wage Statement Obligations and Add Specific Requirements for Temporary Services Employers

By: James Kachmar

As you know, documentation is essential to performing even routine HR functions. You have potential employees fill out numerous pre-hire documents. You have employees sign employment agreements and other documents when hired. During the course of employment, you have employees sign additional documents, such as acknowledgments regarding your employee handbook, change in employment status documents, etc. But have you sat down recently to review whether all of the documents you are having employees sign are consistent? The recent case of Grey v. American Management Services demonstrates why you should.


Continue Reading Employers – Have You Checked Your Documents Lately?