When a workplace practice conflicts with an employee’s religious beliefs, the employer must consider whether a religious accommodation is available. This is the basic rule of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Many times, these issues arise in the form of scheduling conflicts when an employee’s religion compels worship on a particular day. Typical examples of religious accommodations can include changing an employee’s regular working schedule or allowing him or her to switch shifts with a co-worker. Such accommodations are typically made in response to a relatively traditional perception of religious expression. However, an employee’s religion, extends beyond traditional notions of religious practices. So what happens when an employer is presented with religious accommodation requests from Vegans? While clearly a first world problem, our Courts have been busy addressing this weighty issue.

Continue Reading Vegan Religious Bias Claim Settles for Enough to Buy A Big Juicy Steak

By:  Brendan J. Begley

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law earlier this month the Workplace Religious Freedom Act, AB 1964, a bill that expands the prohibition against religious discrimination by employers. This new law mandates that workers receive equal protection despite their religious beliefs or appearance while protecting those who wear religious attire. The bill reportedly was numbered after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a series of federal statutes that were among the first to outlaw employment discrimination in the United States.


Continue Reading New Law Requires Rethinking Dress Codes and Religious Accommodations for Employees