Summary of Program

Federal and state OSHA laws protect California workers from unsafe working conditions.  However, the federal and state statutes and regulations are complex and can be difficult to understand.  This seminar is designed to remove some of the mystery from federal and state OSHA requirements and assist you in maintaining  compliance.  In addition, new regulations require employers to train supervisors about bullying. This seminar will explain those requirements.
Continue Reading Upcoming Webinar – A Health Workplace is a Safe Workplace: Addressing Bullying, Threats and Violence

Recently, my Alma Mater, The University of Southern California, was sued by a former member of the Trojan football team.  Former cornerback Brian Baucham filed a lawsuit against USC and former coach Lane Kiffin, alleging he suffered permanent injuries after being forced to play in a game while he was ill.  Baucham’s lawsuit claimed that he was “forced by Coach Kiffin to play a home game even though Mr. Baucham was very ill and diagnosed by the USC Health Clinic with an influenza-like illness, viral pharyngitis and dehydration.”  After playing in a game against Berkeley, “Baucham suffered from cardiopulmonary damage, as well as brain injury with neurocognitive deficits,” according to the lawsuit.  Baucham alleges that USC and Kiffin violated both the NCAA and USC injury protocol programs when they forced him to play.

This got me to thinking: Now that the National Labor Relations Board has found that scholarship football players are employees under the NLRA, what if Mr. Baucham filed suit against USC as an employee?
Continue Reading Why Employers Should Think Twice Before Making Employees Play Hurt

Summary of Program

Federal and state OSHA laws protect California workers from unsafe working conditions. However, the federal and state statutes and regulations are complex and can be difficult to understand. This seminar is designed to remove some of the mystery from federal and state OSHA requirements and assist you in your compliance.

Program Highlights

By: Lizbeth West, Esq.

What is it?  OSHA Form 300A is a form that summarizes the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during 2013. The form must be posted no later than February 1, 2014 and must remain posted through April 30, 2014. 


Continue Reading REMINDER: The February 1, 2014 Deadline To Post Your OSHA Form 300A Is Fast Approaching

By:       Lizbeth V. West, Esq.

The employment lawyers at Weintraub Genshlea Chediak Tobin & Tobin (WGCT&T) want to remind all employers that their OSHA 300a Annual Summary Report must be posted in the workplace by February 1, 2012 and remain posted until April 30, 2012. Pursuant to OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements, the 300a Annual Summary Report must contain the appropriate information from the employer’s OSHA 300 Logs for workplace injuries and illnesses during 2011.


Continue Reading Attention Employers – Your OSHA Form 300a Annual Summary Must be Posted by February 1, 2012